WRA Co .7-65 LUGER

Any thoughts as to the reason for the “-” (dash) rather than a dot between the 7 and 65?
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Thanks
Paul

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I guess, the person making the bunter was used to calibers like .30-03 or .30-40 and was confused by 7.65 having the decimal point in the “wrong” place.
So the decimal point was put where it belonged, in front of the caliber. And the usual hyphen was used as a second separator, creating .7-65. This gave it the familiar “.” first and “-” in the middle layout.

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Winchester used a similar headstamp on 7.65 x 54 Mauser cartridges.

WRACO 7-65 MM HS

Randy

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Looking into my limited accumulation of 7.65 Lugers I found USC Co also used a dash. not so uncommon I guess.

Paul

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I collect the .30 Luger for its potential use as a small game cartridge. Lots os potential.
I had not giveen a great deal of thoug


ht to the headstamps.

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I, too, love te .30 luger. Enough so that many years ago I had a gunsmith make a 6" barrel for my H&K P9S Target Pistol.

Question: The middle cartridge- Is it stamped " .30. ", or is the second dit not a dot?

I am going to have to dig through mine, (full boxes from 50+ years ago), I saw, I bought, I hoarded!

I am a poor photographer but tried to get good light. I say it is just a ding. The dot being too close for anything intentional. This one came to me from Guy Hildebrand when I had a little dehydration thing going on and my head was not in the game when it arrived. The tighter I try to get on the ding the more it looks like a small ding and not an intentional Dot.
Guy sent several very nice examples and I have enjoyed measuring them and reading old writing on the use of the .30 Luger WRA 30 Luger


cartridge for small game hunting.

For what it’s worth this also has a dot or a ding after the 30.

Whether you are using a cell phone camera, or a point-n-shoot, try backing it off a little bit to get a sharper picture.

Cell phone cameras have a wide angle lens, sometimes with immense digital zoom., and they are supposed to have excellent depth of focus [called Fepth of Field], but that is usually only if it is in focus between +/- 6 feet to infinity…
The problem comes down to what the closest focusing distance actually is.

My nearly 5 year old Samsung will focus clearly down to about 6~7 inches and give me a very nice image. If I get closer it looses sharpness/resolution, but from 6~8 inches I can often enlarge the image in photoshop and “up” the resolution a little [bicubic interpolation] for a nice picture.

For what it is worth, and from MY eyes, the dot/ding after the ‘30’ looks to be the same shape as the dot/ding before the ‘30’.