WRACo 7 x 57 "Standard Cartridges"


#1

Hi, All…

I have seen a few boxes in various calibers over the years: they don’t show up every day!
Again, fairly early top label (3-19) with the green STAYNLESS over-stamp
Front label is pasted directly on the box, not over the top of another, 1-16 date but used much later, April 6, 1934
Cartridges have an oval tinned primer, presumably to identify them as "Standard Cartridges"





Randy


#2

I don’t believe I have ever seen a loading label like that on a WRACo box. Are they commonly found?

HiVel #3 was a 1930s powder that did not stay around long. It was a double base powder, incorporating nitroglycerine and nitrocellulose as components. The story I heard (from a former Hercules chemist) is that the stuff became unstable if stored for long periods in extreme cold (3 years in an unheated storage building in the Canadian arctic). The nitroglycerine component separated from the rest and would detonate when the cartridge was fired.


#3

Frozen nitroglycerine is a well-known danger in explosives, for example Dynamite. It makes the stuff extremely sensitive to shock.


#4

Let’s not make it sound like double-base rifle powders are dangerous. They are not. The Hi-Vel numbers contained only about 10% to 15% nitroglycerine, no different than some of the early DuPont powders used for years in the Cal .30 ammunition. British Cordite contains an even greater percentage of nitro, as much as 50% in some applications. Even Ball or Spherical powders contain some nitro.

The reason that the double base powders, like Hi Vel, didn’t stay around long was because they were corrosive.

Internet stories about the dangers of smokeless powders never cease to amaze me. There was one recently, on another forum, where a guy encountered some badly corroded 30-40 GI cartridges. He pulled a couple of bullets and proclaimed that he had found the reason. He swore that the powder was a bright red color, glowed in the dark, and was a disaster about to happen. To my eyes, the old Peyton powder was still as fresh as the day it was made. I replied that Peyton powder was always a bright orange color and the corrosion was on the outside of the case, not inside, and was the result of improper storage. Needless to say, he never replied, but the seeds of alarm had been sown.

Ray


#5

RAY:

PEYTON POWDER AS MFG. BY THE CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS WAS GREEN, SAYS SO IN THE ORDNANCE REPORTS. EVEN AFTER THEY STARTED GRAPHITING IT, IT WAS STILL GREEN UNDER THE GRAPHITE. I HAVE DISASSEMBLED OVER 500 FRANKFORD ARSENAL CALIBER .30 (KRAG) CARTRIDGES WITH DATES FROM 1894 TO 1928 AND HAVE NEVER ENCOUNTERED AN ORANGE POWDER. CIRCA LATE 1898 OR EARLY 1899 THE ARSENAL STARTED LOADING WHISTLER & ASPINWALL CALIBER .30 POWDER WHICH VARIES IN COLOR FROM LIGHT YELLOW (AMBER) TO MEDIUM BROWN. DURING THE EXPERIMENTAL PERIOD WITH THIS CARTRIDGE, 1890 TO 1894, SOME OF THE CARTRIDGES WERE LOADED WITH RUBY POWDER MFG. BY THE LEONARD SMOKELESS POWDER CO. THIS POWDER WAS RED IN COLOR. I WOULD LIKE TO SEE SOME OF THIS BRIGHT ORANGE PEYTON POWDER.


#6

GWB

Have I mis-identified this powder? HS is F 2 99.

Ray


#7

Ray…

Whistler & Aspinwall…

Randy


#8

Randy - GWB

I’ll confess that everything I know about the Cal .30 (Krag) ammunition I learned in Kindergarten. So, I stand corrected.

That sample of powder has been in a plastic tube, along with the case, for a long time. I don’t recall when or why I pulled the bullet. I can’t find anything in my notes to explain why I labeled it as Peyton powder. Do you have any idea where I would have gotten that idea?

Anyone have a photo of the real Peyton powder?

Thanks to both of you.

Ray


#9

Ray…

Not a photo but this might help…

Randy


#10

Green Peyton powder shown…

Black is exactly the same shape but with black graphite coating covering the green…

Randy