WWI flechettes/aerial darts...ID's...opinions and seek info!


#1

I am proud to have a decent collection of early 20th century flechettes/aerial darts (and most/all are attributed to WWI)

Most have been seen in various articles…I would love to assemble some authoritative opinions as to ID’s and what countires they are attributable too (I have quite a few of them ID’d)

But here is my latest (common German version for reference)

And by the mere fact I have never seen anything like it…it seems suspect to be vintage WWI (and I am soliciting your opinions as to it’s originality)


My concerns?..the head appears to be brazed on…does that “date out” correctly for WWI?
(the fact that the tip has color remnants on it is “suspect”)…does it’s machining look right ? (lathe turned…time consuming eh ?)


Tail…same type of questions…machining look right for that period ?


Check out these 90 degree “folds” in the tail fins…look right ???

Couple others that I consider “suspect” (in my collection)

Any thoughts from our European IAA friends ??

(I know how easy it is to fake anything as primitive as these gravity weapons)

I would like to accrue enough info to write a Journal article and most references to WWI flechettes and aerial darts are buried in European Aviation texts of that period

I am all ears

Pepper
IAA President


Other "Lazy Dog" Designs
#2

Pepper, you might be interested in this book:

emotionprimitive.com/pdf/fic … he_105.pdf


#3

This place sells replica WW1 flechettes, I’m told that they are hard to tell from the real thing.

dugup.co.uk/ware13/wh13_page_3.htm


#4

Thanks for the reference…I will secure it (and then the need for translation!)(I have a couple of articles that need that already)…several of the references I have are from mid WWI vintage Scientific American articles…here they are (as I used them in a SLICS seminar years ago)

Yes the replica issue…I bought all three of them for my collection. If you were to chemically age them…you/we would have an identity issue (as is true of most all replications and the ongoing discussion about replicas. I think most collections have a batch of fakes/replicas (hopefully segregated and ID as such)…and I will collect them, but not pay “too much” for the right to own them.

I welcome any and all thoughts and opinions from those in the know as these “critters” are not very common in the US and even less is written or known about them.


“cool” canister

Pepper


#5

Funny, I was going to post that picture of the hand holding the French one, as I have it in a book from 1915 (focusing mainly on the Canadian element of the war). In the caption I have for it, the claim is made it will penetrate a man from head to foot.


#6

this jive with your info ???

The War Illustrated, 23rd January 1915

The caption under that photo reads…

(The “flechette” as the name implies, is a small steel arrow in use by French, Russian and German aviators. When dropped from above on an unsuspecting solider, it will pierce his body from head to foot. The Royal Flying Corps have not adopted the weapon, partly out of sportsman-like feeling, and because the chances of hitting a mark are remote.)


#7


1915

I apologise for the quality, I used the camera instead of the scanner.


#8

Is/are there any other reference in that book to aerial flechettes other than that photo and caption ? (i.e., should I seek out that book ?)

Pepper


#9

[quote=“Pepper”]Is/are there any other reference in that book to aerial flechettes other than that photo and caption ? (i.e., should I seek out that book ?)

Pepper[/quote]
Some loose factory drawings
jp


#10

[quote=“Pepper”]Is/are there any other reference in that book to aerial flechettes other than that photo and caption ? (i.e., should I seek out that book ?)

Pepper[/quote]
No, its is a generic history, nothing specifically about the flechettes.


#11

[quote=“EOD”]Pepper, you might be interested in this book:
emotionprimitive.com/pdf/fic … he_105.pdf[/quote]

thanks for the tip

I received my book, many nice illustrations and photos, many that coincide with examples in my collection.

(I had no idea that such a book existed…does anyone know of any other reference material ?).

All in all…I am a frustrated collector for not being able to read and digest French…and there is way too much to type into one of the on-line translators.

I will ask around my work for any folks who might be able to read French military verbiage…maybe they can read me a page or two over a cup of coffee!


#12

Pepper: Here is an idea check with the local schools, French is still taught in some schools and for a trade of your FB experiences for a auditorium assembly for some translation work may be the answer with out spending big bucks.


#13

nice tip


#14

#15

[quote=“Pepper”]All in all…I am a frustrated collector for not being able to read and digest French…and there is way too much to type into one of the on-line translators.
[/quote]
Another option is to scan the material to a text format (PDF etc) and then cut and paste chunks to a translator program.