WWII ammo found in NYC waters


#1

Here’s an interesting article about found munitions in the waters near NYC:

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/10/24/divers-live-ammunition-shells-new-york-city-bridge/?test=latestnews


#2

I’ll be practicing diving and lifting REAL heavy stuff.


#3

The comments section is humorous. The one guy saying that they were only .50 cal rounds and they weren’t explosive and the obvious picture of the diver holding a 3" 50 cal casing is just too much.


#4

And the shells are “dangerous to commuters”.

It’s going to take me a while to figure that one out.


#5

When I look at the vidio, I see very neat, small round holes in the .50 cal stuff… like, dummys? The one held up by the diver was so eaten up, you could clearly see daylight thru the case!

Sensationalism?

Not even Slick Rick would want that stuff!

Chief


#6

Yeah the hype about danger to commuters is funny. I’m pretty sure that even 1500rds of current live ammo strapped directly to the bridge wouldn’t take it down it you detonated them. That’s not how those projectiles are intended to be used, forget any possible detonation under water.


#7

In my experience bomb squads and EOD units ALWAYS over state the DANGER in recovery involving civillian incidents. I don’t see this as a problem. It is better that people who do not know what they are doing stay far away from this stuff. Children especially need to have a healthy fear of this stuff. I have had a young teenager hand me a live hand grenade in a gun show. He found it in a park. That should never happen.

Sometimes this does become a problem. For instance , several years ago I sent a large shipment of collector ammo - all inert - to Woodin Lab by Bus
cargo. This was before I learned that things must be packed as if being thrown into the monkey cage at the zoo. The parcel split open and arrived in Tucson with contents spread in the cargo hold of the Greyhound bus. The local EOD folks provided all sorts of report to the Department of Transporation with details of how these items contained live fuzes. They did not. I got a visit from a DOT inspector and had to sign papers to agreeto not ship live ammo by bus again. End of story.

Further , Bomb squad and EOD folks add things to their own personal and reference collections as well when they are called out to investigate dangerous situations. I have plenty of stories from collectors to support that statement.

Again, I don’t see this as a problem. Men who choose to go in harms way deal with these infernal devices deserve a degree of latitutde. An occasional souvenir or bit of puffery is a small compensation for folks who are never paid enough to compenstate for the risks involved in the work.

Many people think that a 3 inch 50 caliber shell is .50 caliber and it is, but not in the terms which we use normally to describe ammunition. That is a GUN description.


#8

Looking at the video, the badly corroded case that the diver has in his hand appears to be for a 20x110 RB Oerlikon round. Conditions there don’t seem to be good for the preservation of these artifacts!

Dave


#9

[quote=“Shotmeister”]When I look at the vidio, I see very neat, small round holes in the .50 cal stuff… like, dummys? The one held up by the diver was so eaten up, you could clearly see daylight thru the case!

Sensationalism?

Not even Slick Rick would want that stuff!

Chief[/quote]

YES I WOULD!!!


#10

They ought to go to the WW1 battlefields. Live shells stacked in the corner of ever field.