WWII Russian Lend Lease 45 ACP Ammo


#1

Hello!

Recently found a guy near me selling cans of these and decided to take the chance and buy one. It was really neat opening the can and seeing the mixed bag of ammo in there!

Now the only decision is whether I should buy all that he has or not…




Is this stuff worth hanging on to or not…?

What do you guys think?

Brian


#2

Although corrosive and over 75 years old, I bet it would
all fire. Evansville Chrysler, especially, made excellent
ammunition, both brass and steel case. Not so many years
ago, probably about 20, two friends of mine fired about 600
rounds of the steel case thru a TSMG with not one single
misfire, hangfire or jam. And this was pretty dirty ammo, and
I don’t mean from firing. It was physically dirty.

If you live in the United States, I would love to buy one package
of this from you. I have been looking for this Russian repack
for years. It was discussed on the forum some time ago.

During WWII, the US sent a lot of tommy guns, M1911(A1) pistols
to Russia, along with ammo. Many of them never got used as the
Russians were rolling out their Tokarevs and PPSh 41s at a pretty
good clip, as well as capturing a lot of Axis weapons.

It is the packaging that makes it collectible, as the ammo is quite common.
Of course, any cartridge is collectible if one collects that category and
does not have it, no matter how common or how rare.

John Moss


#3

I read that the Evansville Chrysler was headstamp “ECC” and Eau De Claire or something like that was “EC”. Regardless it is very cool to find something from that era in this condition. I have seen more headstamps I. This one box I opened than almost all the 45ACP ammoive collected thus far.


#4

So if you don’t want the can lid, I’ll take it!
That’s an awesome find!


#5

Bj - Evansville Chrysler used to headstamps on .45,
“EC” and “ECS.” The “ECS” stood for “Evansville
Chrysler Sunbeam,” meaning their “Sunbeam” plant.
It has been said that at that plant, they only made cases
which were then loaded at “EC.” I cannot confirm or deny
that, but I can say that the did not use any “ECC” headstamp,
at least on .45 or .30 Carbine.

John Moss


#6

I had a couple of articles about this ammunition in the IAA journal, including an addendum in the current issue. Like so many things, a collector can look for a certain thing for years without finding it and then somebody comes up with cases of them. This can is a bit different in that the boxes are stacked vertically. I assume they were that way when the can was opened (?) They were laid out horizontally in my sealed can and it looks like these boxes may have been opened and then closed before being put back in the can.

John; Check your .45 inventory. I sent you a box of these just before the stupid California law went into effect.


#7

John-

There is actually a case headstamped “ECS” in there and I just assumed that t was a steel case. But very cool to learn about what the headstamps All mean. I started collecting 30-06 Ball ammo and have started venturing into the 45, 30 Carbine, and 7.62x51 realm as I’m starting to have a hard time finding new 30-06 that I don’t already own.

Mel-

I opened the can the night I bought it because I had to know what was in it. The pictures are exactly how I found it. When I first punctured the can I could hear the air equalizing so I new it had been sealed. Very neat though!


#8

Mel - I never got the box. Didn’t even know one was sent
me.

John


#9

Way cool!
As long as we are asking [begging?] I would be interested in one [or two?]
of the boxes for my collection, just let me know how much to send where…


#10

I had no idea how interesting this ammo was! Anyone that is interested in boxes of it, PM me. I have the one can open.


#11

Silly follow-up question, but…

Why is the label stenciled on the can in English?
Is there any other writing in Russian anywhere?


#12

BadgerJack, these were for export (back) to the US in the 1990s or 2000s.