WWII Soviet 7,62x54r


#1

Hello all, i have recently come across some battlefield pickup ammunition from Lebanon in 7,62x54r and have some headstamp related questions.

I have a bunch of WWII era soviet ammo in that mix that is marked 544 over 44, 544 over 45 and 544 over 46, also some that appears to be either 322 or 622 over 46 with a 7 cast to the side at about maybe nine o clock.

I cannot identify the 544 headstamp or the X22 headstamp. I have pulled a few of them down and they are standard stick powder with the old type L projectile with the hollow cone shaped recess in the base. All are CWS with the standard soviet type L projectile. Also to be noted is that all of these 1940’s soviet rounds have a translucent dark red primer seal, is this correct for this timeframe? i had read at one point somewhere that 1940’s soviet X54r production did not have primer sealant applied at the time of manufacture, is this correct? If so, why would these be sealed in such a mass and uniformed manner? Are all the Soviet WW2 headstamps so faint? And lastly, why was the switch made from the type L and type D to a strictly LPS light ball inventory in the USSR? I would guess for cost saving on materials (lead) Did the soviets ever prodce the later steel cored heavy ball like the Hungarians and Czechs?

If anyone needs any x54r ball rounds from 1944-present let me know they are all in this box probibly. Just for refrence, I picked up the lot as battlefield pickup in Lebanon by the Isralies and sold as scrap. It is a mix of 95% 1940’s Soviet, some later soviet, and a small ammount of 1950’s Czech steel core heavy ball, with a very small ammount of 70’s chinese, 80’s Bulgarian, and 90’s Romanian with a few rounds of the 1980’s Yugoslavian heavy ball mixed in.

Thanks in advance for any info let me know if i can help anyone out with this lot.


#2

According to Municion.org, 544 was made in Glazov en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glazov
And X stands for Hirtenberger Patrone, Zundhütchen und Metallwarenfabrik, de Hirtenberg. X is a Russian letter “CH” like H is Hirtenberger. 22 is 1922.


#3

Im sorry i should have clarified, by X22 i was symbolizing that i could not clearly read the first number. It appears to be 322 522 possibly 622 i will clean one up a little and take some pictures. It is 100% soviet ww2 era construction appearance. and the dates for that style headstamp i have are 1945/46 the last two numbers are almost certainly 22 and it is not Romanian.


#4

Thanks for clarification, because 1922 did not make sense to me.


#5

Please try and post a picture as the only numbered factories I know of with a 22 in the code are 22 and 322 and both are Romanian. There is a 122 (Serbia) as well but has stars on the headstamps and was newer than your sample. Why are you sure they are NOT Romanian?


#6

Is that “122” on a 7.62x54R? Would you have an image for us? This manufacturer (Sloboda in Chachak) usually made no small arms ammunition.


#7

[quote=“AIRcarbine”] And lastly, why was the switch made from the type L and type D to a strictly LPS light ball inventory in the USSR? I would guess for cost saving on materials (lead) Did the soviets ever prodce the later steel cored heavy ball like the Hungarians and Czechs?
.[/quote]

The reddish laquered primers indicate ShKAS cartridges for aircratft guns (there was also a ground based version).
Yes, head stamps on WWII production can be very faint sometimes and very hard to read.
The “D” (Dalnyii - long range, for indirect fire) was dropped since it got adopted for the M1910 Maxim MG which had a sight marking for “D” projectiles. To my knowledge no other weapon had this feature.
In fact there was a “D” with iron core but this was only an emergency measure during the war in order to save lead. For some reason this projectile was not made continously. The core there was all cylindrical and the OAL was longer than the regular “D”. The tip was also yellow not like the Hungarian ones which were yellow and silver. These are kind a hard to find today but I assume if we pull all “D” from wartime production we will find some of the longer iron cored ones.

Certainly the “LPS” was cheaper than the “L” and certainly had a better effect on target due to the core (maybe little but still).


#8

“Is that “122” on a 7.62x54R? Would you have an image for us? This manufacturer (Sloboda in Chachak) usually made no small arms ammunition.”

No on a 20mm but included it as one never knows what turns up…These are all the codes ending in 22 I have reference to so included them.


#9

The dates being 1945/46 and the fact that the construction of case, projectile and font on headstamp are pretty much an exact match to the soviet stuff of the era. The only thing i have noticed in this headstamp is the material the jacket is made out of is more yellow/lighter than the darker plating on all the others (188,60,544)


#10

[quote=“cartridgecorner”]

No on a 20mm but included it as one never knows what turns up…[/quote]

Must be a 20x128B then, right? Congratulations to a rare case!