X Marked Remington .30-06 bullets


#1

I removed the bullets from some badly corroded Remington (RA 18 and RA H 18), an easy task as the necks were split, and found those from the RA H 18 cases have a raised X on the base. Per Chris Punnett’s .30-06 book, this should indicate that these were 180 grain high pressure test loads, however, they appear to be the same as the unmarked bullets that were in the RA 18 cases, both weighing around 150 grains. Is it possible the raised X was also used for some other purpose than to identify a HPT bullet?


#2

Guy

I have some of those bullets that came from dummy cartridges. In fact, I pulled one just yesterday from an FA 27.

I can’t say what they were originally intended for.

Ray


#3

Hi Guy,

I asked the same question last year

iaaforum.org/forum2/viewtopic.ph … ght=#33461

but got no answers. Also not on my first question on the FN made AP’s, so I
am still puzzeling with those . . . . . .

cheers
Ren


#4

Rene,
Thanks. Your bullet is the same as mine, appearing to be a standard cannelured 150 grain Model 1906 ball bullet, except for the ‘X’. I suppose I need to try to section one of these.


#5

Here are the sectioned Remington bullets from the RA H 18 (on the left) and RA 18 cases.

It was a little more difficult that I had expected; consequently, the results don’t meet the ‘Maketa’ bullet sectioning standards that we have become so accustomed to. I’ve never been too accomplished at getting a hacksaw to cut a straight line even on a flat piece of metal that can be securely locked in the vice, much less a round pointed object. There’s not much difference between the two different bullets appearance-wise, although the jacket seems a little but thicker on the ogive of the unmarked bullet towards the nose. I did find during the cleaning up process (filing and sanding) that the lead core of the unmarked bullet was significantly harder than the X marked one.


#6

Guy

The mark on the one I pulled on Friday is more of a + rather than an x. It looks like the one Rene had posted earlier. Not that it makes a nickels worth of difference, and it still doesn’t answer the question of what it is. If Chris P says it IDs a heavy HPT bullet, maybe they used the same core seating punch on the 150 grain bullets to save $$$. ???

I did read that the lead core is toxic. Very toxic. So don’t go cutting on it.

ray


#7

Ray,
As usual, your timing is impecable and your concern is touching. I have been a little light-headed since doing the sectioning. For what its worth, should I expire, I’ve left instructions in my will for my extensive collections of US Experimentals, Prototypes, Pre-WWII wildcats, and Competition cartridges to be buried with me.


#8

What’s the name of the cemetery?


#9

If nothing else, I am a curious sort. I pulled a bullet on one of the Hoboken cartridges, RA H 18, and got another marked bullet. Definitely a + and not an x. An FA 33 Dummy yielded a plain base.

Ray


#10

Ray,
I think I’ll opt for cremation, and what a show it will be with all that ammo going off!!

Back to the serious business, I’ll agree it probably should be referred to as a plus, assuming Chris P’s association of the mark with high pressure test cartridges is correct. There must be something different about the bullet though; otherwise, what would be the purpose of marking the base.


#11

Where do you suppose all the smart fellows are Ray? You and I left on our own are pretty pitiful at figuring this stuff out.


#12

Guy, I think all the smart guys nap on the weekend. As compared with you and I who nap during the week.

Ray


#13

I think I figured it out! Its a transvanian bullet with a cross used aginst vampires!!! HA!!

Steve


#14

That would mean the jackets must be silver.


#15

Silver is for Werewolves!


#16

[quote=“Guy Hildebrand”]Ray,
I think I’ll opt for cremation, and what a show it will be with all that ammo going off!!

Back to the serious business, I’ll agree it probably should be referred to as a plus, assuming Chris P’s association of the mark with high pressure test cartridges is correct. There must be something different about the bullet though; otherwise, what would be the purpose of marking the base.[/quote]

One reason for it, other than a bullet difference , is to identify the machine or production line the bullet was made on. Any problems found later can then be tracked back.

Various internal markings on bullet bases and between fire holes are quite common in British military rounds for this reason.

Regards
TonyE


#17

Duplicate post deleted.

TonyE


#18

Gentlemen,
I did not say that an “X” on the bullet base was the identification for an HPT round. What I said was that those that I had examined with an R A 18 headstamp and 180-grain flat based bullet had an “X” on the base.

Chris P.


#19

Chris,
That was my error. It was the only place that I found where you mentioned the ‘X’ (or ‘+’) on the bullet and apparently I made an incorrect association.


#20

So Chris, now that I have two of those 150 grain bullets, any idea what they were/are? They seem to be unique to Remington, and possibly only the Hoboken cartridges.

Ray