XM ctges


#1

from left to right :

  1. XM 144 Head: 7.85, CL: 43.94 (5.6 * 44), hstp : WCC 62
  2. XM 144 WE4 Head: 9.12, CL: 44.91 (5.6 * 45), hstp : WCC 62
  3. XM 216 Head: 8.48, CL: 43.94 (5.6 * 44), no hstp
  4. XM 216 Head: 8.48, CL: 43.94 (5.6 * 44), hstp: R A 65

Some questions now :
a) the loading of N


#2

BTT


#3

JP

The XM144WE4 was discussed in an earlier thread. The consensus was, I think, that it is a function testing cartridge and is indeed loaded with a bullet rather than a flechette. IMHO it is the most valuable of the 4 that you’ve shown, by a large margin.

Does number 3 have a blackened primer (or evidence of it having been blackened)? That indicates a dummy loading.

I don’t believe there would be any value difference between numbers 3 and 4 unless you happen to collect headstamps and/or Remington.

Ray


#4

[quote=“Ray Meketa”]JP

IMHO it is the most valuable of the 4 that you’ve shown, by a large margin.
Ray[/quote]

Thanks !!
What is IHMO ??
JP


#5

jp

An ACRONYM. It’s one of those Internet time savers. Things I used to hate but now use all the time. I sometimes think that my grandchildren have forgotten how to speak a language and converse in Acronyms instead.

See the FAQs Forum for a complete listing. It means In My Honest Opinion, or, in my case, In My Humble Opinion.

Ray


#6

[quote=“Ray Meketa”]jp

An ACRONYM. It’s one of those Internet time savers. Things I used to hate but now use all the time. I sometimes think that my grandchildren have forgotten how to speak a language and converse in Acronyms instead.

See the FAQs Forum for a complete listing. It means In My Honest Opinion, or, in my case, In My Humble Opinion.

Ray[/quote]
Lol!!!
Thanks
JP


#7

BTW “XM” is simply indicates something experimental. Example, the designation for the blank round for the M16 was originally the “XM200”, then changed to “M200” when approved for production.

The US changed to this in the late '50’s, I think - up until then, the designator was “T”.

The “T/XM” and “M” designators are used on everything, not just ammo.

Experimental variations of previously standardized items are usually labeled with an “E” suffix, i.e. M16E1. This would be changed to “A” for improved items that go into production.

This is not a hard-and-fast rule. The .50 “M2HB” stands for M2, Heavy Barrel. Not that I’ve ever seen the light barrel!


#8

this is a question, not an answer - could the “light barrel” version of Ma Deuce be the aircraft version with the full-length perforated cooling-jacket around the barrel, ala the Browning M1919A4 and A6 .30 caliber versions? I ask because after years of just saying M2HB I also just realized that I had never seen any called “Light Barrel Model.”


#9

John

I think you’re right. The M2HB is generally referred to as the “ground” version in the M2 Browning series. The M2 Aircraft and M2 Antiaircraft being the others.

Ray


#10

Spot on: liberatorcrew.com/15_Gunnery/01_50cal.htm


#11

Hey! I got one right. You taxpayers out there should be grateful that I remember a little bit of what my Uncle Sam taught me 50+ years ago.

Ray