You have to laugh

This is the front page of today’s Daily Mirror, celebrating British success on VE day. Yes, that ammo strip the soldier is holding obviously symbolises the best of…oh, hang on a minute…?

2 Likes

BREDA 20MM STRIP, for the AA cannon ( both Ground and Naval).
The soldiers are probably Aussies either at Tobruk, or Syria, where they took a number of Bredas, as there were not sufficient AA guns available…after the Aussies shotdown a couple of Spitfires in the Syrian Campaign,
( misguided Brit pilots) the British ordered the Aussies to withdraw the guns from use.
Resourcefull, these Aussies.
Shell is similar to German 2cm
( 20x138B).
Doc AV.
( Syrian event noted in the Official History of Australia in WWII)

2 Likes

Kiwis too, Desert Rats/LRDG mounted some on their vehicles. If it wasn’t nailed down, looked useful or was a bit shiny the Kiwis were well known to utilise any spare equipment.

1 Like

“Lybian Desert. 1941. Defenders of the Tobruk Fortress during the siege. Use of captured Italian anti-aircraft guns and ammunition to ward off Nazi planes.”

4103840
Source: https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C13651

4093404
Source: https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C13652

Same picture was used for the cover of “Oorlog in de woestijn” (War in the desert).

Full resolution image:

1 Like

I learned something new as a result of discussion about this: that the ammo strip (which might be more accurately be called a tray, as it is just a rigid metal plate with clips to hold the cartridges) was inserted “upside down”, with the cartridges underneath. This applied to the Scotti AA guns as well, they used the same trays.

1 Like