Yugoslav 7.62x39 M67 development

Can anyone point me to a source of information concerning the development of the M67? Why it was developed, and what (if any) stages the development went through?

Thanks for any help.

1 Like

I would love to know some info on this subject too

Have you received any info on this Sir?

Tony, sorry for not seeing your message earlier.
In my opinon it is basically the same reason why the U.S. dropped it 7.62 mm M59 iron core bullet and switched to M80 lead core.
An iron core bullet is more expensive to make and, due to being assembled from a larger number of components, more difficult to keep within tolerances (mass and excentricity).
Similar to German war economy (SmE bullets), the Soviet postwar economy considered (and seems to consider to this day) saving of lead as more important than reduced production cost of making lead core bullets. The same applied to saving copper by using steel cases, which require many more steps during manufacture compared to brass cases. For example, in Germany each factory had to install new furnances which could produce the much higher temperatures required for steel case production.
In my view, Yugoslavia had the luxury of a much more “western” economy than other states of the Eastern bloc. Lead was no longer considered a strategic material to be saved at all cost. So Yugoslavia took the same step as the U.S. (M80) or postwar Germany and returned to the much easier to produce lead core bullet, replacing the M56 by the M67. For the same reason, Yugoslav cases are usually brass.

1 Like

@ Jochem
M56 replaced by M67 ?

1 Like

Sorry, typo in the last line. I meant Yugoslav 7.62x39 M59 replaced by M67.

1 Like

This ends my dreams about a sensation :wink: