Zettl multi projectile experimental system


#1

aa


#2

Great, the first photo I see.
The inventor was the Hungarian Engineer ZETTL. The cartridge was projected for up to 27 projectiles and from 8-30mm. There were serious problems in gas pressure dispersion from projectile to projectile with all related problems. Most experiments were made with 15mm and max. 10 projectile cartridges. Basics were evaluated with an 8mm version.
Just recently there was longer article in the German collectors bulletin with several drawings.
You say your’s is 9mm?
Could you show us the head stamp?


#3

It is a design model. Count the projectiles in the photo.


#4

Sorry,that is the top not the bottom in the photo. I sold this years ago so I’ll have to go searching for the current owner and headstamp. Don’t wait up.


#5

[quote=“EOD”]Great, the first photo I see.
The inventor was the Hungarian Engineer ZETTL. The cartridge was projected for up to 27 projectiles and from 8-30mm. There were serious problems in gas pressure dispersion from projectile to projectile with all related problems. Most experiments were made with 15mm and max. 10 projectile cartridges. Basics were evaluated with an 8mm version.
Just recently there was longer article in the German collectors bulletin with several drawings.
You say your’s is 9mm?
Could you show us the head stamp?[/quote] Do you have some dates ?


#6

IT is impossible to say ZETTL in English - must have an E on the end. Was Zettle working for the Germans or ???


#7

On 28 August 1943 the first demonstration of Zettl took place. That was the beginning of the development which at least continued till November 1944. Main use was supposed to be aircraft armament but also infantry and AA use was considered.
For some unknown reason the Danes were doing something with this design in 1947. I wonder if some ammo engineers went abroad after the war to keep on developing stuff like several of the German aircraft engineers did.


#8

No doubt they did. The gas problem of multiple projectiles seems to have been solved by the METALSTORM folks.


#9

Steve Fuller did a piece about this in the ICCA publication some time ago. Now that they are all on a DVD it should be easy to find. I have not bought one yet. My computer doesn’t play DVDs.


#10

Well, I would prefer to stick with his real name. Otherwise almost every foreign name has to be altered for easier English pronounciation really twisting everything.
Zettl was working for the “MOM Optical Plant” and had the idea for this weapon system. He proposed it to the Wehrmacht in 1943 and got the chance to demonstrate it on the date mentioned.
In 1943 Hungary was a German allie (beside the fact that Hungary likely did not have the research facilities and specialists to evaluate this idea at all).


#11

Yes, but Metalstorm (being a 150 years old German development) is way different as you know.


#12

They were having a heck of a time working out the electronics 150 years ago in Europe.


#13

They certainly managed without electronics, just the good old black powder and a bullet with a central flash hole containing a delay train. Here a 15mm.


#14

What Metalstorm has refined was invented by the Chinese far into the distant past. Their “fireball stick” is still around in what we call a “ROMAN CANDLE”. The METALSTORM version of the Roman candle is far more complicated and technological as one would expect. BUT HERE IS THE GOOD NEWS; I found the rest of my Zettle photos and the one which I put up is not the German one but rather the U.S. made one which was made after the war at Aberdeen. Here is the base :


#15

Is it correct that a US 37mm AT gun case was used?


#16

Yes.


#17

John, get the CD version. It works great.


#18

OK, I will. Thanks. Can you find Steve’s short article on the Zettle in your set ?


#19

The ECRA-Article has 5 and a half pages.


#20

Did they actually have any Zettles ?